Course: Blue Belt Stripe 1 Course

Lead Instructor:  Ryron and Rener Gracie
 Access:  All   Status:  Active   Course:  $540.00
The objective of the Blue Belt Stripe 1 course is to build on your Gracie Combatives foundation. Broken down into seven positional chapters, this course features 60 lessons that will teach you the next layer of highly-effective street applicable techniques as well as the counters to the original Gracie Combatives techniques. To explore the lessons and chapters of the Blue Belt Stripe 1 course, simply scroll down on this page. And to learn more about the contents of any particular lesson, simply click on the "Learn More" link below the lesson description. All the published Master Cycle lessons can be accessed instantly for as low as $35/month with one of our convenient subscription plans, or you can purchase any individual lessons for a one-time fee of $18, as a full chapter (price varies depending on the number of lessons), or $540 for the complete BBS1 course. To explore the content of each lesson, scroll down on this page, and to learn more about our most popular subscription programs, as well as watch sample videos from each, click here.

Course Lessons (61)

Free (Registration Required)

Master Cycle Intro Class

In this short intro, Ryron and Rener discuss everything you need to know, do, and have in order to get the most out of the Master Cycle. Watch this first, and then get ready for Lesson 1 - Superho...

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Lesson 1: Super Hooks (Ch1.1: Mount Controls)

The white belt mount control tactics minimized space. Super Hooks will totally eliminate space and make you a master of the mount.

Lesson 2: High Mount (Ch1.1: Mount Controls)

If the opponent tries to get out with the Elbow Escape, you will need this sequence of high mount strategies to retain control.

Lesson 3: Surprise Rolls (Ch1.2: Mount Escapes)

In this lesson, you will learn three highly effective Trap and Roll transitions that you can use to surprise your opponent after they neutralize your initial Elbow Escape attempt.

Lesson 4: Surprise Elbows (Ch1.2: Mount Escapes)

Now, you will learn the best transitions to the Elbow Escape when your opponent neutralizes the Trap and Roll.

Lesson 5: Americana Armlock (Ch1.3: Mount Submission Counters)

Although the most effective Americana Armlock counter is to avoid letting your arm get pinned to the ground, it is very likely that, one day, a stronger opponent will catch you by surprise. When th...

Lesson 6: Straight Armlock (Ch1.3: Mount Submission Counters)

If you accidentally extend one or both arms during a panicked escape attempt and your opponent spins for the armlock, you can use these Straight Armlock counters as a last line of defense.

Lesson 7: Twisting Arm Control (Ch1.3: Mount Submission Counters)

In this lesson, we will discuss three counters to the Twisting Arm Control. By knowing the counters, you will not only become a much harder target for your opponent, but your effectiveness in catc...

Lesson 8: Neck-hug Sequence (Ch1.4: Mount Submissions)

The power of the Neck-hug Sequence comes from the presentation of multiple simultaneous threats. If they counter one technique, then they open the door for another. Either you win, or they lose!

Lesson 9: Cross Choke Sequence (Ch1.4: Mount Submissions)

First, we will discuss the most effective cross choke variations. Then, we will teach you how to use them in combination and, most importantly, how to avoid losing the position once you latch on to...

Lesson 10: Control Flow (Ch2.1: Side Mount Controls)

The standard Side Mount control strategies learned in the Gracie Combatives course are fully reliable in situations when you’re trying to control a much stronger street fight opponent. Against an o...

Lesson 11: Knee on Stomach (Ch2.1: Side Mount Controls)

Using the mount or side mount to control an opponent in a crowded area can be dangerous since you don’t know who might kick you in the back of the head. The Knee on Stomach position is a great alt...

Individual Lesson Price: $0

Lesson 12: Bump and Shoot (Ch2.2: Side Mount Escapes)

Usually, a street fight opponent will create space for side mount escapes in their attempts to punch you. A more skilled opponent is primarily concerned with controlling the position, so it is les...

Lesson 13: High-low Guard (Ch2.2: Side Mount Escapes)

The simplest and most reliable side mount escape is the Shrimp Escape. But, sometimes a stronger opponent will control your hips so tightly that even the Bump and Shoot technique will not work. W...

Lesson 14: Americana Armlock (Ch2.3: Side Mount Submissions)

The primary objective from the side mount is to maintain control of your opponent, exhaust their energy, and then transition to the mount position where you can win the fight with ease. When your ...

Lesson 15: Elbow Cup Armbar (Ch2.3: Side Mount Submissions)

If there is one technique that enabled Ryron to keep his brotherly edge over Rener and Ralek during their teenage years, it was the Elbow Cup Armbar. Once he establishes the underhook from the side...

Lesson 16: Safe Hands (Ch2.4: Side Mount Submission Counters)

The best submission counter strategy is to assume a safe defensive position that blunts the opponent’s attacks. In this lesson, we teach you how to position your hands in a way that nullifies all ...

Lesson 17: Posture Prevention (Ch3.1: Guard Controls)

Anytime a skilled opponent lands in your guard, they will want to establish posture. In a sportive setting solid posture prevents many submissions and creates guard pass opportunities, and in a str...

Lesson 18: Pass Prevention (Ch3.1: Guard Controls)

The Double Underhook Guard Pass is the first closed guard pass you learned and therefore the first guard pass you must learn how to neutralize. In this lesson we discuss how to prevent the opponent...

Lesson 19: Knee Split Pass (Ch3.2: Guard Passes)

In a street fight, passing the guard is a relatively simple process since you can use strikes to open the guard and then go straight to the Double Underhook Pass covered in Lesson 36 of the Gracie ...

Lesson 20: Standing Pass (Ch3.2: Guard Passes)

If you have trouble passing your opponent’s guard from a kneeling position, you can use these standing guard passes to get the job done. By standing up in your opponent’s guard, you put more gravit...

Lesson 21: Triangle Choke (Ch3.3: Guard Submission Counters)

The best Triangle Counter is to avoid getting caught. In this lesson, we will teach you how to use your knowledge of the Stage 1.5 Triangle Choke strategy to prevent it before it happens. First, w...

Lesson 22: Straight Armlock (Ch3.3: Guard Submission Counters)

The more effective you become at applying the Straight Armlock from the guard, the less likely you are to ever get caught in it. In this lesson you will learn two reliable emergency escapes you can...

Lesson 23: Kimura (Ch3.3: Guard Submission Counters)

Only if you learn the counters to a submission, can you become a master at its application. In this lesson you will learn the early, late and emergency escapes to the Kimura Armlock from the guard...

Lesson 24: Wrist Control Sequence (Ch3.4: Guard Submissions)

The guard submissions you learned in the Gracie Combatives course are designed to take advantage of the most likely behaviors that you are likely to experience against an unskilled larger opponent....

Lesson 25: Triple Threat (Ch3.4: Guard Submissions)

From the mount or from the guard, the primary offensive benefit of the gi is that it creates an array of cross choke opportunities for you. In this lesson, we will teach you a how the basic cross c...

Lesson 26: Scissor Sweep (Ch3.5: Guard Sweeps)

The sweeps you learned in the Gracie Combatives course were specifically designed to take advantage of the opponent’s off balance attack behavior to achieve the reversal. In this lesson, you will ...

Lesson 27: Cross Sweep (Ch3.5: Guard Sweeps)

In the Gracie Combatives course you learned the Hook Sweep from Stage 5. Sometimes, however, your opponent is standing over you, but is positioned in a way that prevents the Hook Sweep from being p...

Lesson 28: Butterfly Guard (Ch3.6: Sport Guards)

Although limited in street applicability, the Butterfly Guard is highly-effective in the sportive setting. If you find yourself underneath a larger opponent who is stubbornly based on their knees,...

Lesson 29: Spider Guard (Ch3.6: Sport Guards)

The Spider Guard is one of the original sport guards and still highly utilized in today’s jiu-jitsu tournaments. Although it is 100% sport, and relies entirely on the use of the gi, it effectively ...

Lesson 30: Guard Recovery (Ch4.1: Half Guard Bottom)

Although you will learn many sweeps and even some submission strategies from the bottom of the half guard, against a larger street opponent, the most important skill is that of being able to recomp...

Lesson 31: Take the Back (Ch4.1: Half Guard Bottom)

One of the primary benefits of utilizing the half guard is the ease with which you can transition to your opponent’s back. In this lesson we will discuss the important role that underhooks and eff...

Lesson 32: Elevator Sweep (Ch4.1: Half Guard Bottom)

You’ve learned the Elevator Sweep from the guard, now you’re ready to learn its half guard equivalent. Anytime your opponent drapes their body over yours and lowers their hips to the ground to set ...

Lesson 33: Tripod Pass (Ch4.2: Half Guard Top)

If you find yourself in your opponent’s half guard, your first objective should be to neutralize sweeps and prevent them from recomposing the guard. Once that is taken care of, you need to pass th...

Lesson 34: Sitting Pass (Ch4.2: Half Guard Top)

If your opponent is able to establish the underhook from the bottom of the half guard, it can be dangerous for you to stay on your knees since it may allow for sweeps or a back mount transition. Fo...

Lesson 35: Three-Quarter Guard Pass (Ch4.2: Half Guard Top)

If your opponent is able to escape their knee from the bottom of the half guard, they end up in what we call the three-quarter guard. From there, they will fight to free their foot and put you in ...

Lesson 36: Crossover Control (Ch5.1: Back Mount Controls)

The back mount is arguably the best place to be in a fight. You have a variety of submission opportunities and your opponent can do little, if anything, to harm you. The most important thing, howev...

Lesson 37: Triple Threat (Ch5.1: Back Mount Controls)

Getting the back is one thing; closing the deal is another. In a street fight, the only submission you really need is the Rear Naked Choke. If, however, you find yourself on the back of a skilled o...

Lesson 38: Choke Sequence (Ch5.2: Back Mount Submissions)

From the back mount, the most important thing, aside from maintaining control, is to become very proficient at attacking your opponent’s neck. In this lesson we will explore several additional det...

Lesson 39: Double Threat (Ch5.2: Back Mount Submissions )

Now that you are proficient at attacking your opponent’s neck, you are ready to begin creating combinations of attack. The most fundamental and reliable combination is the Double Attack that includ...

Lesson 40: Early Escape (Ch5.3: Back Mount Submission Counters)

This is the original back mount defensive strategy of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Not only will it save your neck when you’re caught in a tight spot, but it will teach you the principles that govern virtuall...

Lesson 41: Frame Escape (Ch5.3: Back Mount Submission Counters)

The Early Escape is the foundational back mount escape strategy. If your opponent is able to establish the over-under control from the back, however, they might be able to prevent your immediate es...

Lesson 42: Open Guard Setup (Ch6.1: Straight Foot Locks)

When facing an opponent who is savvy with their legs, it can be very challenging to pass the guard. Foot locks are a great way to put your opponent on the defensive, changing their focus from pass-...

Lesson 43: Primary Counter (Ch6.1: Straight Foot Locks)

When you’re on the bottom of the open guard, your foot is in danger. If you focus too much on defending the foot lock, then your guard will get passed. If you focus too much on preventing the pass,...

Lesson 44: Standard Toe Hold (Ch6.2: Toe Hold Foot Locks)

When you go for the Straight Foot Lock on someone who doesn’t know how to defend properly, it is very common for him or her to try to roll wildly to escape. To counter this, the most important thin...

Lesson 45: Primary Counter (Ch6.2: Toe Hold Foot Locks)

The Toe Hold Foot Lock is responsible for more leg/foot injuries than any other leg lock. The most important principle for surviving Toe Holds is discussed in great detail in this lesson, and it w...

Lesson 46: Reverse Drop (Ch6.3: Knee Locks)

The knee lock is one of the most feared submissions in the books. If fully applied, the knee lock can cause irreparable damage the knee. To make matters worse, the pain usually doesn’t kick in unti...

Lesson 47: Primary Counter (Ch6.3: Knee Locks)

The most reliable counter to the knee lock, as with any submission, is to avoid getting caught altogether. But, since the mind can easily get distracted in a position as dynamic as the bottom of th...

Lesson 48: Standard Heel Hook (Ch6.4: Heel Hooks)

Like the knee lock, the heel hook is an extremely dangerous submission that can cause irreparable damage when applied aggressively or carelessly. Although it takes years to master this devastating ...

Lesson 49: Primary Counter (Ch6.4: Heel Hooks)

This is the primary escape and the foundation for all heel hook escapes. This must be perfected to defend advanced heel hook set ups.

Lesson 50: Sucker Punch Defense (Ch7.1: Front Attack Defenses)

The Sucker Punch is one of the most challenging attacks to defend against simply because it is extremely powerful and it occurs with such little notice from the opponent. In this lesson, we teach y...

Lesson 51: Standing Headlock Defense (Ch7.1: Front Attack Defenses)

Headlocks are the most common form of street aggression from untrained individuals. In the Gracie Combatives program, you learn the standard defense to the standing headlock, but you don’t learn ho...

Lesson 52: Rear Choke - Standard (Ch7.2: Rear Attack Defenses)

The most challenging street fight attacks to defend against are the ones that happen by surprise. Of all the attacks that someone could target you with, there are none more surprising than those th...

Lesson 53: Rear Choke - Pullback (Ch7.2: Rear Attack Defenses)

The Standard Variation of the Rear Choke Defense is very effective once your reflexes are soundly developed. But, if rather than simply choking you from behind, your attacker wraps your neck and pu...

Lesson 54: Club Defense - Close Range (Ch7.3: Weapon Defenses)

Although most street fights take place between two weaponless individuals, in the event that an armed individual attacks you, you need to know what to do. One of the most widely available and most ...

Lesson 55: Knife Defense - Overhand (Ch7.3: Weapon Defenses)

According to law enforcement officials, a knife attack, or any edged weapon at that, can cause as much if not more bodily harm than a gunshot. Although your first line of defense should be to avoid...

Lesson 56: Gun Defense - Front (Ch7.3: Weapon Defenses)

If someone’s sole objective is to kill you, you will have a very hard time stopping them. Usually, if someone threatens you with a gun it’s because you have something that they want – such as a car...

Lesson 57: Over-under Clinch Control (Ch7.4: Clinch/Takedowns)

The optimum clinch control position you can establish in a fight is Double Underhook Control. In this lesson, we introduce you to the key principles of the Over-under Clinch position and then we te...

Lesson 58: "Pisão" Front Kick (Ch7.4: Clinch/Takedowns)

If we could add one technique to the Gracie Combatives program, this would be it. Tested and perfected over three generations, the front kick, or “Pisão” in Portuguese, is the key to establishing t...

Lesson 59: Takedown Chain (Ch7.4: Clinch/Takedowns)

In the Gracie Combatives program, you learned the simplest and most reliable takedown strategies for an untrained, larger, street-fight opponent. In this lesson we teach you a chain of takedown str...

Lesson 60: Double Leg Counter (Ch7.4: Clinch/Takedowns)

In order to become a takedown specialist, you must also master your takedown defense strategies. In this lesson, we introduce you to the quintessential Double Leg Takedown defense strategy, the spr...


Course Specs

Course Goals

  1. Understand the Course Topic
  2. Refine your ability to execute the techniques presented in the Course
  3. Become familiar with the drills that can be used to develop your skills
  4. Achieve significant proficiency in the material

Testing & Certification

Related Tests:


Lead Instructor

Ryron and Rener Gracie

Gracie University Chief Instructors

Ryron and Rener Gracie are the eldest grandsons of Grand Master Helio Gracie, the creator of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Their father is Rorion Gracie, one of the world’s foremost experts in self-defense. In 1993, Rorion created the Ultimate Fighting Championship to showcase the supremacy of the family’s self-defense system in a realistic “no holds barred” confrontation against all comers. Rorion’s younger brother, Royce, won 3 of the first 4 UFC tournaments proving that the leverage-based techniques of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu provided the most reliable way to defeat a larger, more athletic opponent. Ryron and Rener were born into this family tradition of testing the art against all challengers.

Rorion introduced his sons to the art as soon as they could walk. As children, they watched him teach private classes in their garage in Southern California. But, it wasn’t until they observed their father and uncles – Royce, Rickson, and Royler – easily winning challenge matches that they began to comprehend fully the effectiveness of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Even more important, Ryron and Rener recognized the profound impact the family’s art had on all who studied it. The life changing transformations of Gracie University students motivated the brothers to teach the art. While constantly perfecting their physical techniques, they worked equally hard to master the powerfully effective instruction methods developed by their forbearers. In 2003, Grand Master Helio Gracie awarded Ryron and Rener black belts in recognition of their mastery of his unique techniques and teaching methodologies.

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