Lesson 34: Belly Down Back Mount (Ch5.1: Back Mount Controls)

Lead Instructors:  Rener GracieRyron Gracie
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The inferior belly down back mount position is the single most dangerous and demoralizing position in all of jiu-jitsu. We’ve briefly discussed a few entries into the belly down back mount earlier in the curriculum. In this lesson, we will delve into the details of some of the most effective yet unorthodox methods of acquiring the position. We will also discuss the essential positional control and submission strategies so that anyone who is unfortunate enough to land underneath you will have no choice but to tap out.
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Lesson Specs

Lesson Goals

  1. Understand the Course Topic
  2. Refine your ability to execute the techniques presented in the Course
  3. Become familiar with the drills that can be used to develop your skills
  4. Achieve significant proficiency in the material

Instructions

  1. Watch the Lesson.
  2. Take notes on essential details.
  3. Bookmark key points in the videos for future reference.
  4. Ask questions in the Forum if you need help.
  5. Review the lesson multiple times to build confidence.

Lesson Slices

  1. Modified Mount Entry
  2. Belly Down Connections
  3. Rapid Mastery Drill: Level 2
  4. Focus Sparring: Mount Startup
  5. Mindset Minute

Lead Instructors

Rener Gracie

Gracie University Chief Instructor

Ryron and Rener Gracie are the eldest grandsons of Grand Master Helio Gracie, the creator of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Their father is Rorion Gracie, one of the world’s foremost experts in self-defense. In 1993, Rorion created the Ultimate Fighting Championship to showcase the supremacy of the family’s self-defense system in a realistic “no holds barred” confrontation against all comers. Rorion’s younger brother, Royce, won 3 of the first 4 UFC tournaments proving that the leverage-based techniques of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu provided the most reliable way to defeat a larger, more athletic opponent. Ryron and Rener were born into this family tradition of testing the art against all challengers.

Rorion introduced his sons to the art as soon as they could walk. As children, they watched him teach private classes in their garage in Southern California. But, it wasn’t until they observed their father and uncles – Royce, Rickson, and Royler – easily winning challenge matches that they began to comprehend fully the effectiveness of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Even more important, Ryron and Rener recognized the profound impact the family’s art had on all who studied it. The life changing transformations of Gracie University students motivated the brothers to teach the art. While constantly perfecting their physical techniques, they worked equally hard to master the powerfully effective instruction methods developed by their forbearers. In 2003, Grand Master Helio Gracie awarded Ryron and Rener black belts in recognition of their mastery of his unique techniques and teaching methodologies.

More...

Ryron Gracie

Gracie University Chief Instructor

Ryron and Rener Gracie are the eldest grandsons of Grand Master Helio Gracie, the creator of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Their father is Rorion Gracie, one of the world’s foremost experts in self-defense. In 1993, Rorion created the Ultimate Fighting Championship to showcase the supremacy of the family’s self-defense system in a realistic “no holds barred” confrontation against all comers. Rorion’s younger brother, Royce, won 3 of the first 4 UFC tournaments proving that the leverage-based techniques of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu provided the most reliable way to defeat a larger, more athletic opponent. Ryron and Rener were born into this family tradition of testing the art against all challengers.

Rorion introduced his sons to the art as soon as they could walk. As children, they watched him teach private classes in their garage in Southern California. But, it wasn’t until they observed their father and uncles – Royce, Rickson, and Royler – easily winning challenge matches that they began to comprehend fully the effectiveness of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Even more important, Ryron and Rener recognized the profound impact the family’s art had on all who studied it. The life changing transformations of Gracie University students motivated the brothers to teach the art. While constantly perfecting their physical techniques, they worked equally hard to master the powerfully effective instruction methods developed by their forbearers. In 2003, Grand Master Helio Gracie awarded Ryron and Rener black belts in recognition of their mastery of his unique techniques and teaching methodologies.

More...

Other Lessons in This Course

Free (Registration Required)

BBS3 Intro Class

In this intro class to Blue Belt Stripe 3, Ryron and Rener discuss Training Equipment, Recycling, Principle Ownership, and the Helio Gracie Mindset. Everything you need to know to start into BBS3. Once you watch the intro, it's time to get ready for Lesson 1 - Modified Mount Control!

Free (Registration Required)

Lesson 1: Modified Mount Control (Ch1.1: Mount Controls)

The Modified Mount Escapes taught in the Blue Belt Stripe 2 course are very effective. To maximize their utility, however, you must understand their weaknesses. We will teach you to counter the escapes using effective hand-fighting, how to salvage the top position, and an amazing transition to reverse triangle setup...

Lesson 2: Hip Thrust Counters (Ch1.1: Mount Controls)

Larger opponents, skilled or unskilled, commonly use the hip thrust mount escape. Your best defense against this powerful technique is to stay low and maintain constant hip pressure. If your opponent catches you off guard, you will need some very specific control systems to maintain the top position. We will teach t...

Lesson 3: Back Door Escape (Ch1.2: Mount Escapes)

The Back Door Escape is one of the most difficult to counter. It’s extremely quick and incredibly powerful. When added to your mount escape arsenal, this technique will make it nearly impossible to hold you in the high mount. We will teach the core version of the technique, and then we’ll teach you what to do when t...

Lesson 4: Shadow Counters (Ch1.2: Mount Escapes)

It’s extremely demoralizing to be trapped underneath someone with heavy hip pressure and solid Shadow Hooks. We will teach you the three most reliable counters to the Shadow Hooks, starting with the Shadow Smash. Once you learn this lesson, not only will your mount escape confidence skyrocket, but your mount control...

Lesson 5: High Mount Armlock Counters (Ch1.3: Mount Submission Counters)

The High Mount Armlock is Ryron’s favorite mount submission. Having dealt with this technique for as long as he could remember, Rener has some very reliable defenses to share. If your “safe hands” fail, then you can use a precisely timed leg whip to return your elbow to safety. If the leg whip fails, there are two ...

Lesson 6: Arm Triangle Counters (Ch1.3: Mount Submission Counters)

The Arm Triangle Choke is a very popular no-gi choke that is most often applied during transition. Ideally, elbows positioned safely away from your face will prevent the choke. But, if your opponent slips their head under your triceps, you can use these techniques to counter the submission. We will start with the s...

Lesson 7: Gi Choke Extras (Ch1.4: Mount Submissions)

The gi is a weapon that can be used for or against you. In this lesson, we’ll teach you all the sneaky mounted gi chokes that you wish you would have learned a long time ago, starting with the nut-cracker choke!

Lesson 8: Neck-Hug Extras (Ch1.4: Mount Submissions)

The Neck-Hug Sequence is Rener’s favorite attack system from the mount. We introduced the basic concepts in BBS1, and then taught you the counters in BBS2. Now it’s time to take the entire system to the next level! We will teach you several new wrist isolation methods and new submissions, starting with the death gri...

Lesson 9: Split Control (Ch2.1: Side Mount Controls)

If your opponent gets an underhook from the bottom of side mount, they can quickly escape by shrimping to guard or turning to their knees. In this lesson you will learn a powerful new control system to immediately nullify the underhook and retain control of the position. Once you perfect it, Split Control will quic...

Lesson 10: High-low Escape Counters (Ch2.1: Side Mount Controls)

The high-low guard recovery is one of the most common escapes from side mount, because it’s the fastest way to get both legs in the fight from the bottom. In this lesson, we discuss the three most important control concepts you need to know to prevent the high-low guard from catching you off guard. We’ll start with ...

Lesson 11: Back Door Escape (Ch2.2: Side Mount Escapes)

From the bottom of side mount, your top priority is punch protection and submission awareness. Once those two are covered, it’s time to escape. The more skilled your training partner is, the more difficult it is to find windows of escape opportunity. In this lesson, we introduce you to one of the most surprising si...

Lesson 12: Knee on Stomach Escapes (Ch2.2: Side Mount Escapes)

Knee on Stomach is one of the most demoralizing positions in jiu-jitsu. Besides the fact that you can’t escape, the unique sensation of having your opponent’s full body weight driving into your abdomen makes for quite an un-pleasant experience. In this lesson, we introduce four escapes that will help free you from t...

Lesson 13: Outside Arm Attacks (Ch2.3: Side Mount Submissions)

You can never have too many submission options in your arsenal. Although you’ve already learned several chokes and armlocks from side mount, in this lesson you will learn four outside arm attacks that can be used in combination to take your attack pressure to the next level. We begin with some critical Kimura option...

Lesson 14: D’Arce Chokes (Ch2.3: Side Mount Submissions)

The D’Arce Choke is quickly becoming one of the most popular chokes in jiu-jitsu. It’s easy to catch due to the fact that it can be applied any time someone tries an escape or takedown in which they lead with their head. Although it can be applied from virtually any position in the fight, it is most comm...

Lesson 15: Armlock Counters (Ch2.4: Side Mount Submission Counters)

The best armlock defense is to use safe hand positioning to prevent them altogether. In cases where you get caught off guard and your arms are isolated away from your body, you’ll need to remain calm so you can identify the escape window when it presents itself. In this lesson, we’ll discuss several survival strateg...

Lesson 16: D’arce Choke Counters (Ch2.4: Side Mount Submission Counters)

The first line of defense against this popular choke is to understand it. Now that you’ve learned the D’arce Choke, it’s time to discuss the specific hand-fighting tactics you can use to shut it down the instant your opponent shoots for it. We’ll also discuss a really cool escape you can use when you are in the turt...

Lesson 17: Advanced Punch Block Series (Ch3.1: Guard Controls)

One of the most important lessons in the Gracie Combatives course is the Punch Block Series from the guard. Now it’s time to take your distance management skills to the next level. In this lesson, you will learn new grips from each stage and the best way to strike or submit your opponent from the bottom. We will sta...

Lesson 18: Arm Drags (Ch3.1: Guard Controls)

Your ability to execute many guard techniques is heavily influenced by your opponent’s physical attributes. The Arm Drag is highly effective against an opponent with an extreme weight advantage. By swiftly redirecting your opponent’s energy, you can very efficiently take the back or sweep your opponent. First, we w...

Lesson 19: Over-Under Pass (Ch3.2: Guard Passes)

The Over-Under Pass is a time-tested technique that works against opponents of all sizes and skill levels. The success of this pass rests in your ability to immobilize your opponent’s hips while removing their feet from the guard retention equation. First, we will teach you the standard variation of this pass, and t...

Lesson 20: Leg Drags (Ch3.2: Guard Passes)

Leg drags are amazing. By combining deceptive speed and immediate follow-up pressure, you can use leg drags to pass the most seasoned guards. We will begin by teaching you the most important principles of redirection and distance management, and then show you the three most effective leg drag variations. Once you co...

Lesson 21: X-Guard Passes (Ch3.2: Guard Passes)

Now that you have spent several months utilizing the X-guard and its various sweeps, it’s time to learn how to exploit its weaknesses. First, you will learn the most reliable ways to free each of your legs from the X-guard’s unique hook configuration. Then we will discuss what to do if your opponent is too tight and...

Lesson 22: Guillotine Counters (Ch3.3: Guard Submission Counters)

As always, the best submission counter is to avoid getting caught to begin with! When it comes to Guillotines, your defensive strategy is largely contingent on the opponent’s leg and hand configuration along with their particular squeezing tendencies. In this lesson you will learn four Guillotine Counters, based on ...

Lesson 23: Omoplata Counters (Ch3.3: Guard Submission Counters)

Once you understand the omoplata’s inner workings, it’s quite easy to defend against it. In this lesson, we will share the four most reliable omoplata counters based on your opponent’s tightness/control. We will start with the preferred escape, the Cross Jump, and then show you how to free your arm as the situation...

Lesson 24: Arm Crush (Ch3.4: Guard Submissions)

Traditionally, you can only apply a straight armlock if your hips are behind the elbow joint, but with the Arm Crush this rule doesn’t apply. This dynamic straight armlock generates incredible pressure on the elbow joint from unexpected angles. We will begin by teaching you the two most reliable arm crush setups, an...

Lesson 25: Overhook Series (Ch3.4: Guard Submissions)

The Overhook Series is a classic attack system from the closed guard that has application from the mount as well. But unlike the mount, when working the overhook from the guard, you can incorporate triangles and omoplatas into your attack. By learning to eliminate one or your opponent’s arms from the equation, you ...

Lesson 26: Omoplata Sweep (Ch3.5: Guard Sweeps)

When you originally learned the omoplata, we noted that the majority of your omoplata attempts would result in sweeps, rather than submissions. In this lesson, we take your omoplata capabilities to the next level with several variations designed to sweep rather than submit your opponent. Ironically, your omoplata sw...

Lesson 27: Pendulum Sweep (Ch3.5: Guard Sweeps)

The Pendulum Sweep is one of the most reliable and beautiful sweeps in all of jiu-jitsu. It’s typically used from the closed guard position, and when applied correctly, it leaves your opponent feeling totally off balance (and quite embarrassed). In this lesson, we will teach you five variations of this spectacular s...

Lesson 28: De La Riva Guard (Ch3.6: Sport Guards)

Developed by Ricardo De La Riva in the 1980s, the De La Riva Guard (DLR Guard) is a sport guard that is particularly effective for people with shorter legs. Although its street applicability is limited because it emphasizes leg control over hip control, the DLR guard provides several unique ways to off balance your ...

Lesson 29: Deep Half Guard (Ch4.1: Half Guard Bottom)

Of all the half guard strategies in jiu-jitsu, the Deep Half Guard ranks as one of the lowest on the “street applicability” scale. But, when it comes to energy efficiency and effectiveness against skilled opponents, it’s at the top of the list. It works so well because it puts you immediately underneath your opponen...

Lesson 30: Z-Half Guard (Ch4.1: Half Guard Bottom)

The Z-Half Guard is a dynamic variation of the half guard that provides reliable punch protection and several opportunities for reversals and submissions. We will teach you to use a knee shield to manage the distance between you and the opponent, and then how to manipulate your their balance to seal the deal. Once y...

Lesson 31: Deep Half Passes (Ch4.2: Half Guard Top)

Even though its street applicability is limited, the Deep Half Guard is highly effective and increasingly popular. Now that you have explored the Deep Half Guard sweeps, it’s time to learn how to shut them down. We will begin with the most important Deep Half Guard entry prevention methods, and then we’ll show you ...

Lesson 32: Z-Half Passes (Ch4.2: Half Guard Top)

The primary benefit of the Z-Half Guard is that it provides the user with a high degree of distance control from the bottom of the fight. To pass the Z-Half, you must close the distance established by your opponent’s knee shield. In this lesson, we will teach you four ways to disrupt their distance control and pass ...

Lesson 33: Double Weak Side (Ch5.1: Back Mount Controls)

In this lesson, we will teach you how to prevent the strong side crossover, and, if your opponent succeeds, how to transform the strong side into the weak side to frustrate them beyond measure. “Double Weak Side” will change your life forever.

Lesson 34: Belly Down Back Mount (Ch5.1: Back Mount Controls)

In this lesson, we will delve into the details of some of the most effective yet unorthodox methods of acquiring the position. We will also discuss the essential positional control and submission strategies so that anyone who is unfortunate enough to land underneath you will have no choice but to tap out.

Lesson 35: No-gi Turtle Chokes (Ch5.2: Back Mount Submissions)

We begin with the anaconda choke and then add the most effective variations of the D’arce and the Peruvian Neck Tie. Learn them so you’ll know what to watch out for next time you’re turtled up!

Lesson 36: The Twister (Ch5.2: Back Mount Submissions)

In this lesson, we will cover the primary setups and the leg lock connections commonly associated with it. Even if you never “twist” anyone, learn the technique so you know when to tap.

Lesson 37: Triple Threat Counters (Ch5.3: Back Mount Submission Counters)

Only someone who masters the triple threat system can effectively defend against it. After many years of practicing the triple threat, it’s time to exploit its weaknesses and neutralize the system. We will dissect each attack component so that you can choose the best escape based on your opponent’s control emphasis...

Lesson 38: Belly Down Escape (Ch5.3: Back Mount Submission Counters)

If trapped in the belly down back mount position, your chances of escape are slim. However, if your opponent makes even the slightest mistake in their control, you might be able to finesse your way out. It all boils down to angle management. In this lesson we’ll teach you what angles to look for and what angles to a...

Lesson 39: Ankle Hook Entry (Ch6.1: Straight Foot Locks)

It is simple to break an ankle using a footlock. The complexity of footlocks comes from the many ways to enter the position. The more entries, the more complicated matters become for your opponent. In this lesson, you will learn a dynamic entry from the open guard for use on opponents of any size. The setup, known a...

Lesson 40: Belly Down Counters (Ch6.1: Straight Foot Locks)

The belly down foot lock is one of the most dangerous ankle locks because your opponent’s entire body weight is directly on your ankle. Although the window of escape is small, there is hope. In this lesson, we discuss two quick counters based on your opponent’s foot position.

Lesson 41: Quick Catches (Ch6.2: Toe Hold Foot Locks)

Toe hold foot locks tear ankles unforgivingly fast because they directly target the ligaments. As a result, smart partners tap quickly allowing you to catch toe holds from unorthodox positions and with less control. From side mount bottom, your opponent’s are usually fixated on countering armlocks and chokes creatin...

Lesson 42: Quick Catch Counters (Ch6.2: Toe Hold Foot Locks)

The first line of defense against quick catch toe hold setups is to recognize them. Now that you have learned the details of the attacks, it’s time to explore their weaknesses. You will not only increase your survivability against the quick catches, but also sharpen your attacks as you gain familiarity with potentia...

Lesson 43: Top Half Setups (Ch6.3: Knee Locks)

Like foot locks, the best way to catch knee locks is to set them up from unexpected positions and circumstances. Few opponents will expect you to attack their legs from the half guard. In this lesson, you will learn three methods to attack your opponent’s legs from top of half guard, starting with the drop step v...

Lesson 44: Top Half Counters (Ch6.3: Knee Locks)

Awareness is the first and most important step in any counter. Now that you know the most common half guard setups for the knee lock, we will show you how to shut them down. We will begin with the drop step and the lockdown spin, and then we will teach you an emergency escape for when your leg is fully extended and ...

Lesson 45: Heel Hook Connections (Ch6.4: Heel Hooks)

The more fluidly you can link your leg lock attacks, the greater threat you pose to your opponents. Every time your opponent spins out of a heel hook, they are vulnerable to a knee lock, and every time they spin out of a knee lock they expose a heel hook. In this lesson, we will dissect three critical connections th...

Lesson 46: Donkey Kick (Ch6.4: Heel Hooks)

Heel hooks are very dangerous because of the twisting pressure it applies to the knee. We taught you to protect your knee by spinning in the direction of the pressure, but you risk getting caught in a knee lock. In this lesson, we will add the one skill that is absolutely necessary to safely free you from the leg en...

Lesson 47: One-Handed Attacks (7.1: Front Attack Defenses)

In this lesson, we add to your arsenal four defenses against one-handed front attacks. First, we teach two shoulder grab variations and then show another sneaky inverted wristlock for use against a flat-handed chest push. Finally, we introduce two counters to the “aggressive handshake.” Once you complete this lesson...

Lesson 48: Two-Handed Collar Grabs (7.1: Front Attack Defenses)

An aggressor with a great size or strength advantage will commonly use both hands to grab your shirt or jacket. Their willingness to grab you with both hands indicates they don’t fear your punch. In this lesson, we will share three two-handed collar grab counters, including what to do when slammed against a wall.

Lesson 49: Headlock Defenses (7.1: Front Attack Defenses)

Headlocks are the most common form of street aggression. In this lesson, we add four more headlock defenses to your survival arsenal. We begin with two headlocks for use against a postured opponent, and then we transition to headlock counters when pinned against a wall. Go easy on the slams!

Lesson 50: Kick Defenses (7.1: Front Attack Defenses)

In a street fight, punches are several times more likely than kicks, but that doesn’t mean they don’t happen. Like punch defense, kick defense is all about distance management. In this lesson, we introduce the most important kick counters. We will teach you two front kick counters, including one that can be used aga...

Lesson 51: Guillotine Defenses (7.1: Front Attack Defenses)

In a clinch, you’re highly vulnerable a headlock or a guillotine. Your survival hinges on your ability to identify the grip and respond with the right technique. In this lesson, you will learn three more standing guillotine defenses including the one variation that every MMA fighter must know. Choose a trusted partn...

Lesson 52: Rear Grab Defenses (7.2: Rear Attack Defenses)

An assailant will attempt an ambush from behind to maximize their advantage. You already know how to counter the most common bear hugs and chokes. In this lesson, we’ll address the two-handed rear choke, the full nelson, and a defense to the rear bear hug when the opponent’s arms are too high under your armpits. Al...

Lesson 53: Rear Choke Defenses (7.2: Rear Attack Defenses)

Defending against unexpected rear attacks presents the greatest challenge. To increase your chances of survival, we will add two rear choke defensive techniques to your arsenal. Use the side throw when your pivot fails, and the shoulder slip to free your neck if the opponent has a fully-locked rear naked choke!

Lesson 54: Hostage Knife Defenses (7.3: Weapon Defenses)

Hostage situations are everyone’s worst nightmare. If held hostage by a knife-wielding person, stay calm and attempt to resolve the situation using verbal and psychological jiu-jitsu. If you must defend yourself, you’ll be thankful for the two hostage knife defenses in this lesson. We’ll also show you another front ...

Lesson 55: Holstered Gun Defense (7.3: Weapon Defenses)

When the attacker has a gun, quickly try to flee the scene. If you can’t escape, gain control of the weapon to neutralize the threat. In this lesson, we will discuss two more gun defenses for use when the assailant attempts to draw a holstered weapon. First, you will learn the cross draw defense, then we will show y...

Lesson 56: Hostage Gun Defense (7.3: Weapon Defenses)

If someone has a gun to your head, do what they ask. If you can’t comply, defend yourself. In this lesson, we teach you two new hostage gun defenses – one for the side stickup and one for the rear stickup. As with all previous gun defenses, the objective is the same: deflect the arm, close the distance, and quickly ...

Lesson 57: Arm Drags (7.4: Clinch/Takedowns)

The most important part of any takedown is the setup. Without it, your opponent will read your intentions and pre-empt your move. One of the most deceptive takedown entries is the arm drag. The arm drag triggers a pull-back response which exposes your opponent to your takedown. In this lesson, we will discuss how to...

Lesson 58: Throwing Techniques (7.4: Clinch/Takedowns)

Grand Master Helio thoroughly enjoyed practicing throwing techniques in his younger years. But as he got older, he dedicated less time to their practice due to his small size and aging body. Although throws require extensive practice and impeccable timing, they can end a fight quickly and decisively. In this lesson...

Lesson 59: Wall Takedowns (7.4: Clinch/Takedowns)

If you must fight in an enclosed space, it’s likely that you will end up against a wall. In this lesson, we will discuss the critical details for maintaining optimal control of your opponent against a wall, and then we will introduce the most important takedown concepts for taking the fight to the ground.

Lesson 60: Wall Takedown Counters (7.4: Clinch/Takedowns)

As always, understanding wall takedowns is the key to preventing them. In this lesson, we will dissect the weaknesses in each of the wall takedown and control techniques to increase your chance of reversing the situation. We will begin with a critical wall switch technique, then discuss how to prevent the takedowns ...