Gracie Philosophy

The Survival Mindset

 | 
Slide
  
1
There are no drills available for this lesson.
Confidence Level: 
Notes: (4,000 character limit)
You must be logged on to save lesson notes.
Bookmarks

You must be logged on to add bookmarks.
Viewing History

You must be logged on to use the Lesson Chat.

Moderated Lesson Forum

Post a question:
You must be logged on post a forum question.

Page: 1 of 1   
whole word
Q. Excellent presentation and explanations by Ryron and Rener - I really enjoyed that. My question is: One of my takeaways from watching the first nine lessons (I just purchased this course yesterday) is that once the first punch is thrown by the perpetrator or the thug who is harassing and continuously attacking me - is to get inside and clinch. Once clinched, I stay close, slowly wearing out/depleting the perpetrator/thug's out energy level Once the thug's energy reserves are sufficiently worn away - I can go in for the hold (arm bar, leg lock, ankle lock etc) which will bring an end to the aggression. So my question is, in the former, we take the perp/thug to the ground right away, wearing him down - Can I wear him down, when he is consistently trying to punch me, avoiding his punching by keeping distance. And say, if it is a more confined space/area, but large enough for movement, keep away from perp/thug by doing a series of 'slips' and also moving and keeping the constant distance (just out of punching range) through avoidance by moving away. My idea is that I could slip and move away from perp/thug, while the perp/thug expends energy attempting to punch me over and over, but myself keeping the distance (just out of range) until he runs out of energy, once I see he is sufficiently depleted, I can go in for the clinch, take down and hold leading to submission. This could be similar to if the perpetrator/thug is chasing me, and I happen to be more cardiovascularly fit the thug/perp - I can run the perp/thug out "run him out" until his energy store is expended, then again, go in for the clinch, take down and hold, leading to submission - which makes my life easier, has he is worn out and tired and I still have a lot left in the tank to deal with him. This is similar to Ryron was speaking of when grappling with the younger student on that sunday he spoke of, but in my example, I am keeping distance and avoiding the perp/thug - as the thug wears himself out. I have to say I mention this, as I used to be middle long distance runner in the younger years - not good at sprinting, but I am good for the long haul.
FireFlyFrenchie (4/4/2020 1:47 PM)
A. The dangers in attempting to exhaust the opponent from the outside are 1) you're more likely to take a hard shot on the outside than inside and 2) without timing and skill it's difficult to avoid the BG's attacks for a long time. You're not only at increased risk of being hit hard, but also likely to exhaust at the same speed or faster than the attacker. It would only work if you're in better shape than the attacker (as you may be), but it's not something that would work for everyone.
Gracie University 1
Q. Just want to say thanks for all the insight and answers to questions that are very helpful and eye opening. Im loving this course so far!
Russell Sharp (12/4/2019 5:27 AM)
A. You're welcome!
Gracie University 1
Q. This is enlightening. However, i have a question. For example, if i am not worried about submitting someone in a hurry and i am just holding position for a few minutes how do i leep from getting exhausted if the opponent is behaving chaotic and trying to escape like his life depended on it. I know that might be a vague question b cause of the numerous bariotions and positions, but could you think of some soecific example and tips? Thank you
Russell Sharp (12/3/2019 8:25 AM)
A. What makes the holding positions work is that they not only enable you to control the aggressor, but also allow you to conserve energy while your opponent struggles. You're banking on the other guy exhausting because they're working harder.
Gracie University 1
Q. This mindset is so much useful for lower belt right, especially white belt. Because the higher belt always have more techniques n experience better than the lower. So this is the most effective way to deal with it right?
taqiudin (10/23/2019 11:18 AM)
A. Always, regardless of rank.
Gracie University 1
Q. At 14:30 Rener equates the chances of getting knocked out to 50/50 i.e. 50%. In reality, there are two outcomes (50/50), BUT as I've learned from the Bros. the "chances" (odds, probablity...) is so much higher than 50%! This is major! I love the content and PHILOSOPHY but I'm a stats nerd. :)
Willskey (9/25/2018 6:49 PM)
A. Thanks for the feedback!
GracieUniversity8
Q. Do Ryron and Rener personally reply to question? Just curious.
bear55 (10/11/2017 6:37 PM)
A. Once in a while, they are very busy with a multitude of other projects!
GracieUniversity8
Q. Great Mindset: winning by not losing.
joaofilipecosta (3/5/2017 6:37 PM)
A. If you don't lose, there is only one other possible outcome!
GracieUniversity8
Q. I love this mindset and I'm extremely thankful that I started my jiujitsu journey this way from Gracie combatives and studying Rener and Ryron. Watching Ryron in metamoris while only a white belt became my inspiration and idol for jiujitsu and this Philosophy became my goal. I want to say thank you toy you guys for the way you have taught the art and shared this healthy ego of learning and progressing. Also as a Gracie blue belt and as someone who competes in the sport setting quite often this still works! I think people will be surprised how helpful and useful embracing this idea in the sport setting can be. Just wanted to share my experience in that with you guys. It's mostly street but is also sport applicable. I believe it was Ryron in some seminar talked about allowing yourself 10 or 15 seconds to relax and just survive don't even attempt to pass or escape. That, plus the survival mindset, has allowed me to do very well i competition but also train for self defense. Thank you guys!,
ThreeLeggedHippo (2/11/2017 5:36 PM)
A. Awesome, thanks for the feedback!
GracieUniversity8
Q. In a street fight, wouldn't it be ideal to end the fight quickly by applying the techniques aggressively rather than just trying to survive?
Imperialist (1/9/2017 12:47 PM)
A. The point is that you don't get a vote against a bigger, stronger, or more athletic opponent. You apply the technique when the opportunity presents itself and use the necessary amount of effort to succeed. If you have the opportunity to execute the technique with little chance for failure, then go for it.
Gracie University 1
Q. This has completely changed the way I roll, can not thank you enough!
Matt198d (12/21/2016 7:06 AM)
A. You're welcome, Keep It Playful!
GracieUniversity8
Q. Was the survival mindset part of the reason Royce was chosen to go to UFC besides his low weight? In the fights, it seems that he had a 100% survival mind set. In the other hand, Rickson and Relson, for instance, also have perfect tecnique, but looks like they have a much more attack mindset.
rigitano (5/14/2016 6:30 PM)
A. Rorion chose Royce because he was small and unimposing. He felt it would make his point about the effectiveness of Gracie jiu-jitsu if the representative had no attributes that could be used as an excuse for the victory such as physical strength, size, athleticism, or a string of tournament victories. Royce had none of these things, so he was the ideal candidate.
Gracie University 1
Q. I adopted this mindset right away after watching this video. Went from bluebelt to purple/brown belt immediately.
Vash1202 (12/24/2015 8:49 PM)
A. Mission accomplished!
GracieUniversity8
Q. I live overseas and train with a small group of guys. For the last year or so I have been focusing on training in the way described in this video and ryron's video "the universal misunderstanding." When I am back home in Canada on vacation I train at a local sport bjj school and sometimes I almost feel like guys are offended by my style of training. A purple belt (I'm a blue belt) was watching me roll today and afterward he came up to me and said "you can't just lie on your back and defend when someone is mounted on you. when someone mounts you, FREAK OUT and get them off you." my favorite kind of roll is one where I have spent a good amount of time chilling/defending on the bottom before I escape. I love this mindset, but the average sport bjj player always feels the need to tell me it is a mistake.
scottgrieve (6/27/2015 11:00 PM)
A. And that's what differentiates us from the rest of the community.
Gracie University 1
Q. It would seem that a student is less athletic and strong might improve faster than another comparable student who is more athletic because they are not used to "winning" on a physical level and therefore, might be more inclined to have the "survival" mindset.
BCC (4/3/2015 8:45 PM)
A. It's different for everyone.
GracieUniversity8
Q. I watched a video where Pedro Sauer was explaining that the foundation of Helio Gracie Jiu JItsu is survival, but "for you to be master of surviving, we gotta have masters of attacking in the school." I have heard Ryron say in another video that when you become comfortable in worst case scenarios eventually there are no more worst case scenarios and you will therefore be more willing to go for submissions because if your attempt fails you will end up in a position where you are still comfortable. How does one balance this advice (Pedro's and Ryron's) with Helio's advice "stop trying to win. Just don't lose?" Like Ryron and Rener said in the video, if they both played the survival game, no submissions would take place. They also said that when they roll they try to kill each other, so obviously they are not rolling this way on a daily basis.
scottgrieve (3/17/2015 6:17 AM)
A. We call it focus, or cooperative, sparring and it's fundamental to our training methodology. One partner focuses on the attack while the other attempts to survive. This applies to all techniques as there are always two sides to every situation.
Gracie University 1
Q. I recently watched a video on Youtube where representatives of the Gracie Family accepted a challenge of a Karate School. Of course, the Gracies won all the fights - but they did so in less than a minute in every fight. Every time, a karate guy tried to bench press his way out of the mount, his Gracie Opponent would spin for an armlock, rather than trying to exhaust and control his opponent with a high swim or other technique. Does this mean that the survival mindset looses its importance as we advance through the ranks since our armlocks will eventually because so good, that by the time we are blackbelts, we can easliy tap a stronger unexperienced opponent even without tireing them out first?
FTF1310 (11/28/2014 9:09 AM)
A. The survival mindset always prevails! In this situation, they saw an opportunity to finish the fight, and they seized it.
GracieUniversity8
Q. When rolling in 5 minute rounds is it wiser to use survival mindset and roll as if you were rolling 35 or 45 minute rounds? I find myself using survival for 4 minutes then taking the last minute to attack relentlessly
slurmy (7/18/2014 1:12 PM)
A. Good question. When rolling for a short period with a partner who shares the Gracie training philosophy, there's nothing wrong with being more attack oriented than you might be during the "exhaust the BG" phase of the fight. As long as you understand the context and are consciously bypassing this stage in the interest of training efficiency, you're good to go.
Gracie University 1
Q. Huge respect to Ryron for putting this philosophy into practice in contemporary competition! As a smaller guy who trains with monsters, it is awesome to see how effective this mindset is and that you guys are willing to prove it on the mat against a world
Sigmarsson (10/29/2013 11:18 AM)
A. Agreed, his performance in Metamoris I, was an amazing display of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu!
GracieUniversity8
Q. Is this mindset still apropriate in a 4 minute match for competition? To just survive?
ohz (3/24/2013 7:05 PM)
A. No. Your survival mindset will keep you from being knocked out, but it's likely you'll lose on points or be penalized for stalling.
Gracie University 1
Q. Why hasn't anyone posted on this?! The lesson was great
ogood23 (11/5/2012 10:31 PM)
A. Thanks for the support!
GracieUniversity8
Q. I was looking for you last fourty years! Thanks!
Dmitri (9/22/2012 1:38 PM)
A. And you have found us!
GracieUniversity8
Q. I love this, I preach this when teaching self defense and I get traditionalists who do not understand this concept.
k1mura (7/23/2012 2:23 PM)
A. Perfect, keep the fire!
GracieUniversity8
Q. It's registered and I'm already utilizing the Survival Mindset.
OnFire (7/18/2012 9:14 PM)
A. Perfect!
GracieUniversity8
Q. Ryron, so those were the two sentences that your grandfather said to you to make your defense go from brown belt to black belt in two weeks. "Stop trying to beat Royce. Just don't lose."-Helio Gracie Keeping it real in Brooklyn!!!
OnFire (7/17/2012 1:34 PM)
A. Correct.
GracieUniversity8
    Page: 1 of 1